LUANGPOR TEEAN PDF

He replied that this kind of meditation was widely practised before the time of the Buddha. When we emerge from the concentrated state, our mind is still subject to greed, anger and delusion, it has not really changed. It is like placing a rock upon the grass. Even though the grass under the rock may wither, as soon as it is exposed to sunlight the grass will grow again. This is different from Insight Meditation vipassana , which gives rise to knowing and understanding, to wisdom, the mind changing to a fundamentally better, more normal condition. Vessantara We once asked about the case of Vessantara, who is traditionally held up as the very model of the perfection of generosity.

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He replied that this kind of meditation was widely practised before the time of the Buddha. When we emerge from the concentrated state, our mind is still subject to greed, anger and delusion, it has not really changed. It is like placing a rock upon the grass. Even though the grass under the rock may wither, as soon as it is exposed to sunlight the grass will grow again. This is different from Insight Meditation vipassana , which gives rise to knowing and understanding, to wisdom, the mind changing to a fundamentally better, more normal condition.

Vessantara We once asked about the case of Vessantara, who is traditionally held up as the very model of the perfection of generosity. Yet what he did seems to be an act of great irresponsibility towards his wife and children. Is it true that his act of giving away his family led to him being reborn as the Buddha? Luangpor Teean answered, "The story of Vessantara is a story that has been passed down through many, many generations.

If you think that it is true, then you should follow his example, and give your wife and children to the labourers or farmers in order to help them in their work, and thus you will perfect yourself and become a Buddha.

But let me present to you the following comparison: that what you have with you now, what you are as bound to as to your children or wife, are greed, anger and delusion: give them away, relinquish them completely: are you able to understand this?

Believing Luangpor Teean always said that we should neither believe something immediately nor reject it immediately: we should consider and deliberate very carefully first, or put it to the test, and then either believe it or not. Luangpor remarked that the history of the Buddha provides examples on this point. Angulimala was someone who believed too readily. Even though Upaka recognized in the Buddha characteristics that aroused trust and confidence, he was not willing to believe that the Buddha had become Awakened by himself, and so went on his way, and missed the opportunity to learn from the Buddha.

Those Who Understand His Teaching We once asked Luangpor Teean about the number of people who, after hearing him teach Dharma or after having been instructed by him, could understand his teaching. A person who is developed will be ready and able to understand. But most people interested in Buddhism are still firmly attached to customary practices, such as the making of merit. Luangpor Teean often asked, "Why do we observe moral precepts in a manner similar to taking care of a glass so as to prevent it from breaking?

Morality will then take care of us, rather than we having to worry about looking after morality. Now consider the number of temples that there are in Thailand. If there is a Kathina offering every year in every temple, where could enough sprites be found for everyone who made merit?

We imagine in this way that monks are like bank accountants responsible for calculating the interest owed to us after we die, do we? If we are to benefit from eating rice, we must eat boiled or steamed rice, not uncooked or husked rice.

To be attached to making merit by giving material things in a superstitious way is one form of delusion: to be lost in darkness, even if in this case it is in contrast to Dark Luminosity, a white darkness. Merit at its highest, in its consummation, is to really know oneself, to be without dukkha Suffering. Inflexible I once invited Luangpor Teean to go to teach a man whom I respected, a person who had strong faith in and attachment to traditional forms of merit-making.

When Luangpor returned after meeting the man, I asked about their encounter. That man is inflexible," Luangpor responded, "a person of closed mind. Have you read the history of the Buddha? When the Buddha was newly Awakened, before he went to Benares to teach his former companions, the Five Ascetics, he had thought to seek out his former teachers, Alara Kalama and Uddaka Ramaputta, in order to teach them the liberation he had attained, but then he came to know that both these teachers had already died.

This is something I have some doubt about; since the Buddha-to-be had parted from his two teachers not so long before, I am not certain whether their deaths were physical or not: but what had certainly died were their minds. Monastic Ranks In the time of the Buddha there were no such things as monastic ranks. Why, we asked Luangpor Teean, do we make so much of hierarchy and rank in modern Thailand?

Is it a good thing or not? He answered, "Monastic rank is the creation and concern of society. You could call it either good or bad, whichever you wanted to, but we have to live in their society. We once inquired why it was that some of the men who ordained as monks, studied to a high level, and subsequently left the monkhood, could later behave in evil ways, often worse than ordinary people who had never ordained and studied Buddhism.

Luangpor Teean answered, "Such a person studies only books, studies only theory, but never studies himself and therefore never knows himself. Bowing In Respect To The Orange Robe I once mentioned to Luangpor Teean that it is hard for us to know whether a monk really is a true monk or merely a parasite upon the religion; we simply see someone with his head shaved and wearing the orange robes, and we immediately pay respect.

When the chanting had been completed, and the water in the bowl had been made into holy water, instead of sprinkling it over the people present, as is customarily done, Luangpor took the large bowlful of holy water and threw it all over the floor of the house, saying, "Everybody, please join together and help to put things in order, help to clean the floor: this is what is auspicious.

Using holy water merely to sprinkle upon ourselves, we might suffer allergic reactions to the leaves floating in the water, break out in an itching rash, and have to waste money on buying medicine to treat ourselves: now how could something like that be auspicious! The Funeral Ceremony Once we asked Luangpor Teean, "When we hold a funeral ceremony, does the dead person benefit from the ceremony that we perform for him?

Whether the dead person will benefit from the ceremony or not is something that will always be open to doubt. But what is certain is that the officiating monks will benefit.

Do we think that the monks can fulfil the functions of postmen? But at the ceremony Luangpor did not chant, so the sponsor did not offer him the usual requisites. And he then led the children in bowing to their parents for the first time, he himself setting the example. The villagers present at that time immediately became very agitated, considering what Luangpor had done to be a violation of tradition: they had never seen or heard of a monk bowing to laypeople.

Does, I wanted to know, the spirit really have supernatural powers such that it can either benefit or severely punish the person that owns the house? Just think," said Luangpor. And the food given to it is always such a tiny amount: would the spirit ever be able to satisfy its hunger? With the purpose of requesting an amulet from him, I tried to impress him by showing him a very special and valuable amulet that I owned, boasting that my amulet was very ancient, having been made years ago.

What," he asked me, "is this amulet made of? Luangpor responded, very simply, "Earth of all kinds originated at the same time as this planet came into being. Your amulet is actually no more ancient than the soil we trod upon before we entered this house.

Would you like that? Is its maker still alive? For more extensive coverage on Buddhist Amulets in Buddhism and Zen, their use, the spirituality imbued in them or not, and the sometime outcomes of either belief, please see:.

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Mahasati meditation

Mahasati is my main meditation practice, and it is what I teach to clients at Hope Rehab. People who are dealing with drug withdrawals can struggle when it comes to focusing on the breath, but the physical movements of this dynamic form of meditation are easy to perform. I also like the fact that it is done with the eyes open because this makes it easier to remain mindful afterwards there is no abrupt switch between the practice and real life. Here is a video showing the simple movements of mahasati meditation Practicing mahasati means we develop enough concentration so we can clearly see what is happening in our own minds. The more mindfulness we cultivate like this, the more we can deal with in life.

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LUANGPOR TEEAN PDF

The Buddha taught that each of us could come to the very important point of the cessation of suffering. Mahasati Meditation is a simple and direct method of practice developed by Luangpor Teean Cittasubho, an important teacher in the world of Thai Buddhism. Many teachers, mostly from the East, provide many different forms of meditation. Some teachers use breath-counting and breath-concentration. Others teach concentration on a mantra or a koan.

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