HESIOD SHIELD OF HERACLES PDF

Epic narrative allowed poets like Homer no opportunity for personal revelations. There are three explicit references in Works and Days , as well as some passages in his Theogony that support inferences made by scholars. The former poem says that his father came from Cyme in Aeolis on the coast of Asia Minor , a little south of the island Lesbos and crossed the sea to settle at a hamlet, near Thespiae in Boeotia , named Ascra , "a cursed place, cruel in winter, hard in summer, never pleasant" Works Unlike his father, Hesiod was averse to sea travel, but he once crossed the narrow strait between the Greek mainland and Euboea to participate in funeral celebrations for one Athamas of Chalcis , and there won a tripod in a singing competition. Fanciful though the story might seem, the account has led ancient and modern scholars to infer that he was not a professionally trained rhapsode , or he would have been presented with a lyre instead.

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Evelyn-White As part of my personal project to read what is available of Greek classics in translation, at least to better understand the classical inheritance in contemporary culture and understanding, I got two versions of the same work by Hesiod.

This particular one was translated into prose and serves as a very short and to-the-point discussion of Greek mythology that makes for one of the most important sources about Greek heathen religion available to us. Hesiod is less well-known than Homer, his rough contemporary, but these three works are the ultimate source of a great deal of what is known about the Greek gods and goddesses by contemporaries who know anything about such matters.

I myself made use, somewhat indirectly, of these works as early as my freshman year of high school when I wrote a short play where the Greek heathen deities were ineffective characters in a play I wrote for world history class. This book is about seventy pages long and is divided into three parts. After this comes the Theogony, which is a catalog of various gods and titans and their origins, all of which bears a very strong relationship to the immoral behavior of the polytheistic deities of Babylon and Egypt that likely helped inspire the work and the worldview behind it.

The third story is the shield of Heracles, which reads a lot like the bloody tales in the Aneid and also includes a certain aspect of cataloging items namely the eponymous shield and its importance to some bloody fight with a warlike being. In reading this books I was deeply struck by the contexts in which these books can be found as well as the way in which they resonate with other writings.

It would have been nice if, growing up, I had been more familiar with the raw material of the myths that were written about and passed on by more contemporary popular writers who did not always give credit to the sources of their myths. These myths are rather prosaic and mostly familiar, and it is interesting to note the connection between these stories, which are thought to spring from Thebes and its surrounding area, and the other myths that we are familiar with from the ancient world, as well as the historical account of the Hebrew scriptures.

In life we are presented with a series of mysteries, and it is unsurprising if people should imagine the gods to have been people like themselves and to have wondered why it is that the being who had created us was now estranged from us--there must have been some fault involved.

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HESIOD, SHIELD OF HERACLES

Evelyn-White As part of my personal project to read what is available of Greek classics in translation, at least to better understand the classical inheritance in contemporary culture and understanding, I got two versions of the same work by Hesiod. This particular one was translated into prose and serves as a very short and to-the-point discussion of Greek mythology that makes for one of the most important sources about Greek heathen religion available to us. Hesiod is less well-known than Homer, his rough contemporary, but these three works are the ultimate source of a great deal of what is known about the Greek gods and goddesses by contemporaries who know anything about such matters. I myself made use, somewhat indirectly, of these works as early as my freshman year of high school when I wrote a short play where the Greek heathen deities were ineffective characters in a play I wrote for world history class. This book is about seventy pages long and is divided into three parts. After this comes the Theogony, which is a catalog of various gods and titans and their origins, all of which bears a very strong relationship to the immoral behavior of the polytheistic deities of Babylon and Egypt that likely helped inspire the work and the worldview behind it. The third story is the shield of Heracles, which reads a lot like the bloody tales in the Aneid and also includes a certain aspect of cataloging items namely the eponymous shield and its importance to some bloody fight with a warlike being.

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Hesiod: The Works and Days/Theogony/The Shield of Herakles

She surpassed the tribe of womankind in beauty and in height; and in wisdom none vied with her of those whom mortal women bare of union with mortal men. Her face and her dark eyes wafted such charm as comes from golden Aphrodite. And she so honoured her husband in her heart as none of womankind did before her. Verily he had slain her noble father violently when he was angry about oxen; so he left his own country and came to Thebes and was suppliant to the shield-carrying men of Cadmus.

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The Shield of Heracles

Shelves: mythology , poetry , classics , greece , ancient , good This is a very nice piece of action by Hesiod or, more likely, someone else writing in the style of Hesiod , detailing a fight between Herakles and his nephew Iolaus against the despot Cycnus and his father Ares. Upon seeing his son killed in battle, Ares becomes enraged and goes berserk to where the goddess Athena has to tell him to stop, and we as readers feel sorry for Ares, who, despite being one of the antagonists of the poem, has just watched his son being killed with a spear thrust through the throat. His rage, though brutal, is entirely sympathetic to us. At the end, after the king buries Cycnus, Achilles floods the river causing the river the wash away the grave. A powerful moment, as one cannot help but think "What a senseless waste of human life" at seeing both Cycnus be honoured despite his evil deeds and the river washing away the hard work of everyone who worked on that monument, who were surely innocent. Nonetheless, it is been attributed to Hesiod and thats the basis of this review.

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