ACACIA CYANOPHYLLA PDF

Flowers and leaves Acacia saligna grows as a small, dense, spreading tree with a short trunk and a weeping habit. It grows up to eight metres tall. Like many Acacia species, it has phyllodes rather than true leaves; these can be up to 25 centimetres long. At the base of each phyllode is a nectary gland , which secretes a sugary fluid. This attracts ants , which are believed to reduce the numbers of leaf-eating insects.

Author:Tagami Jull
Country:Netherlands
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Sex
Published (Last):9 November 2013
Pages:101
PDF File Size:1.35 Mb
ePub File Size:8.20 Mb
ISBN:238-8-39213-167-3
Downloads:58613
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Kitaur



Our aim is to develop a better understanding of these patterns of variation to provide a sounder basis for the effective management and utilisation of the species that will be relevant to all growers concerned with its domestication. It is expected that this work will facilitate a more judicious use of the species for large volume wood production and numerous other purposes.

Outcomes will include a formal taxonomic paper delineating the variants and possibly an allozyme study documenting patterns of genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships a genetic study of variation in A. Updated summaries of activities will be presented on this webpage as work progresses.

Analysis of genetic variation and fodder potential in Acacia saligna Research by Nic George and Margaret Byrne As part of work to manage dryland salinity there is interest in the potential of using A. Despite its wide spread utilization as a forage crop preliminary research has concluded that A. The high morphological variability and low feed quality of A. For this reason, a project was undertaken to examine the level and pattern of genetic variation in A.

Genetic analysis of A. The study therefore suggests the presence of at least three genetic lineages within A. The results of this study are currently being prepared for publication. The analysis of the feed quality showed that on average A. The values are comparable to results from other studies of A. However, the study also found there is considerable variation in the feed quality of the populations that were sampled.

The variation in feed quality was also found to be strongly associated with the genetic groups and only weakly associated with climate and soil types. The general conclusion from the work is that the high levels of genetic variation between and within each variant of A. Important aspects of feed quality appear to be under some genetic control so the feed quality of A. However, further work to develop A.

This project is investigating weed and genetic risk aspects of the utilization of A. Acacia saligna has been identified as having weed risk as it has become naturalized in areas of South Australia and Victoria, although it does not show evidence of invasiveness in its natural range in Western Australia. The project will investigate some aspects of the reproductive system that may be implicated in the species weediness in areas where it has become naturalised.

A previous study has identified significant genetic differentiation between the variants of A. The outcomes of this project are focused on the maintenance of biodiversity in natural populations of Acacia saligna in Western Australia and knowledge of the species invasiveness throughout Australia. It prefers deep, sandy soils but adapts well to range of soil types. The species is normally established by transplanting 6-month-old nursery grown seedlings into the field during winter.

Seedlings are grown in multiple cell containers with a cell size of cubic centimeters. Acacia saligna has also been successfully established using bare rooted seedlings or by direct sowing in the field. It grows rapidly and is particularly useful for stabilizing eroding sites. Under cultivation, it tends to have a short lifespan: typically less than 10 years and in some instances less than 5 years.

Acacia saligna nursery grown seedlings. Acaca saligna established by direct seeding, 28 months after sowing. There is interest in developing A saligna as a crop plant for wood and biomass production.

The Search project sought to identify native woody plants suitable for development into commercially viable large-scale crops for low annual rainfall areas less than mm. Acacia saligna was one of about 20 native species that showed good potential to provide feedstock for processed wood products and renewable energy industries.

Farm grown A. The Search project established a number of mixed species field trials between and , which included several provenances A saligna. In addition, a number of spacing trials see figure below using A. CALM is actively monitoring these trials and some destructive yield assessments have been made. Acacia saligna spacing trial. Acaca saligna assessing biomass production. The scope for developing allometric relationships that allow rapid, non-destructive yield estimation is being investigated.

Data from several sites indicates that stem basal area correlates well with fresh above ground biomass. This observation agrees with studies from other parts of the world Laamouri et al. Further work is required to develop low rainfall planting designs that maximise yields and integrate with existing annual crop and pasture farming systems.

This could involve active capture of surface and subsurface water flows. Selective breeding offers the potential to improve growth rates and feedstock characteristics. There is scope to reduce harvesting costs by developing continuous feed harvesting equipment.

The possibility of generating co-products, such as fodder or chemical extractives, is being explored to improve the economic competitiveness of A. References: Laamouri, A.

BILL ROBERTIE PDF

Weeds of Australia - Biosecurity Queensland Edition Fact Sheet

Our aim is to develop a better understanding of these patterns of variation to provide a sounder basis for the effective management and utilisation of the species that will be relevant to all growers concerned with its domestication. It is expected that this work will facilitate a more judicious use of the species for large volume wood production and numerous other purposes. Outcomes will include a formal taxonomic paper delineating the variants and possibly an allozyme study documenting patterns of genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships a genetic study of variation in A. Updated summaries of activities will be presented on this webpage as work progresses. Analysis of genetic variation and fodder potential in Acacia saligna Research by Nic George and Margaret Byrne As part of work to manage dryland salinity there is interest in the potential of using A. Despite its wide spread utilization as a forage crop preliminary research has concluded that A.

AGENDA MENDESAK BANGSA SELAMATKAN INDONESIA PDF

Acacia saligna o acacia cyanophylla: Entérate de la diversidad de usos que tienen

There are also unconfirmed reports that it is naturalised in Tasmania. Also widely naturalised overseas in Africa i. Habitat In Western Australia this species grows naturally in a variety of habitats, but in drier inland areas it is generally restricted to areas near watercourses. It is most commonly found growing in sandy soils, but is also present in clayey soils and around granite outcrops or on rocky hills. Where it has become naturalised it occurs in coastal shrublands, open woodlands, grassy woodlands, heathlands, moist closed forests and near watercourses i. However, it is primarily found in disturbed habitats. Habit An upright i.

KOZIER BARBARA FUNDAMENTOS DE ENFERMERIA PDF

Best Sellers

Description[ edit ] Flowers and leaves Acacia saligna grows as a small, dense, spreading tree with a short trunk and a weeping habit. It grows up to eight metres tall. Like many Acacia species, it has phyllodes rather than true leaves; these can be up to 25 centimetres long. At the base of each phyllode is a nectary gland , which secretes a sugary fluid.

ARISTOTE LA POETIQUE PDF

Acacia saligna syn. cyanophylla

.

Related Articles